Personal data privacy vs. counter-terrorism measures: what will EU parliamentarians decide in 2015?

On February 2015, the European Parliament passed a resolution to address new anti-terrorism measures that should be put in place this year. The document referenced the collection of passenger name records (PNR). Passenger Name Records are, in essence, data about our flight details. It includes several different types of information, such as travel dates, ticket information and payment information.[1]

The EU governments have sought access to this passenger data and requested additional information from airline companies, and therefore third countries’ governments, through far-reaching PNR agreements. The European Commission proposed the EU PNR system as a key tool in the fight against terrorism. On 2010, the EP adopted the EU external strategy on PNR, which opened the negotiations between the EU and Australia, Canada and the United States on the exchange of this type of data between these international actors. Continue Reading

November 2014 EP plenary Newsletter: Motion of Censure, EU-Canada PNR deal, Digital Single Market, and more

In this edition:

1. Juncker Commission easily survives its first big test in the EP
2. The EU-Canada PNR agreement sent to ECJ by the left, ALDE, eurosceptics
3. Large EP majority pushed through a stronger stance on the post-2015 development agenda
4. EPP, S&D, ECR requested Commission’s diligence in settling search engines market
5. EPP, ALDE, Greens/EFA voted to strengthen ECB’s authority to impose sanctions

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The EU-Canada PNR agreement sent to ECJ by the left, ALDE, eurosceptics

The European Parliament approved a resolution tabled by the ALDE group asking for the EU-Canada agreement on the transfer of Passenger Name Records (PNR) to be referred to the European Court of Justice (ECJ) for an opinion on whether it is compatible with the EU treaties and Charter of Fundamental Rights before voting on the new agreement. The PNR agreement was signed by the EU Council of Ministers and Canada on 25 June 2014, but in order to enter into force it needs the consent of the Parliament.

The resolution passed by 383 votes in favour, 271 against and 47 abstentions. The left-leaning groups (S&D, Greens/EFA, GUE/NGL) and the right wing eurosceptics supported the proposal (the EFDD group was split). The conservative EPP and ECR groups decided to vote against the resolution, as they considered that the PNR agreement should be enforced at the soonest, to fight against terrorism and international crime.

Graph PNR EU-Canada

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