Résoudre le « déficit cognitif » pour résoudre le déficit démocratique

Premier prix du concours organisé par Eyes on Europe et ses partenaires, Jonathan Dehoust explore les solutions pour promouvoir la participation de la jeunesse au sein du processus décisionnel européen et, par là même, réconcilier l’Europe avec ses jeunes citoyens.

Si la Belgique est d’une grande complexité institutionnelle avec ses multiples Réformes de l’État – l’épisode Wallonie vs. Continue Reading

The EU Parliamentarians of which country are most present in votes?

The influence in the European politics is determined by many factors, some of which are less transparent or very hard to measure objectively. But one of them that can be quantified objectively is the participation in the votes in the European Parliament. At the end of the day, the EU legislation has to pass through the EP plenary and, as in any democratic decision-making mechanism, the decisions are made by a vote. Continue Reading

Gains and losses of EP political groups in November’s plenary

During the plenary (or part-session) of the European Parliament that took place in late November we recorded some very interesting trends in the behavior of the political groups and which also explain the results of the votes. Here are just a few of them.

How cohesive has been each of the political groups?

For the second Strasbourg session in a row, the EPP group (with 216 members from 27 countries) has shown the greatest level of internal coordination. Continue Reading

Key lessons from the 26-29 October EP plenary

by Doru P. Frantescu, director & co-founder of VoteWatch Europe (@dorufrantescu)

During the plenary (or part-session) of the European Parliament between 26-29 October we saw some very interesting trends in the behavior of the political groups and which also explain the results of the votes. Here are just a few.

How cohesive has been each of the political groups?

Firstly, the EPP experienced a much greater internal discipline (or solidarity) than in the previous part-session. Out of the total 358 roll-call votes (a record high) that took place during the 3 days of voting at the end of October, in was only rarely that EPP Members deviated from the pre-established group line. As a result, EPP was the most cohesive group, with a score of 98% cohesion. Continue Reading

Greens/EFA Members are the most participative in European Parliament votes

Similar to the first six months of the preceding Parliament, the European political group most present in the roll-call votes is the Greens-EFA, with an average participation of 90.5%. It is closely followed by the centre-left S&D group (90%). Interestingly, the non-attached MEPs have become much more participative in votes after the elections: their participation score has gone up from 77% to 89%. Continue Reading

Irish EU parliamentarians least participative. Croatians and Austrians most present

Just over half a year has passed since the Members of the European Parliament have started their work, following the May 2014 European elections. There are currently 751 Members coming from the 28 EU countries. Each month they gather in the parliament’s plenary to vote on new laws and decide what the EU should do to improve the life of its citizens. The subjects addressed cover a wide range of issues, such as civil liberties, economy, environment, foreign policy and so on. Continue Reading