France more likely than Germany to lead the EU Council after Brexit, voting records in the Council show

with special thanks to professor Simon Hix and research assistant Davide Ferrari

First published on July the 17th 2016, this article has been updated to take into account the latest political developments. 

While Theresa May is expected to trigger Article 50 today, on Wednesday, March 29, many observers wonder how the equilibrium of powers in the EU Council will change without the UK at the negotiations table. Continue Reading

Germany in 2017: how would a CDU-Greens-FDP government change Berlin’s policies?

At a time when Europe can count less on the US and the UK, Germany becomes more important than ever in determining the future of Europe, reason for which the entire continent now has a huge stake in Berlin’s future policy orientations. After an incredible 11 continuous years in government, Merkel’s CDU is poised to win yet another round of elections in September 2017. Continue Reading

Merkel’s CDU party loses elections in two of three states during regional polls. The mixed feelings of the Chancellor

The Christian Democratic Union, the party of Chancellor Angela Merkel, has suffered setbacks during regional elections held in Baden-Wuerrtemberg, Saxony Anhalt and Rhineland Palatinate this Sunday, while the right-populist party AfD (Alternative for Germany) gained a large amount of seats in the regional parliaments.

The German chancellor must have experienced different (Facebook-like) reactions to the news about the results of these elections. Continue Reading

Merkel’s MEPs want to consider sending arms to Ukraine, but leftist majority rejects

by Doru Frantescu

(https://twitter.com/dorufrantescu)

In a report of the European Parliament on the military situation in the Black Sea area, some Members supported an amendment asking that the possibility of providing Ukraine with defensive arms should be considered, if Russia does not fully implement the Minsk ceasefire agreements (par. 16/3).

This strong statement generated severe disagreements, dividing the MEPs on both ideological and national lines. Notably, all MEPs coming from Angela Merkel’s CDU/CSU alliance supported the idea. Conversely, all MEPs coming from their coalition ally in the German government, the social-democrats (SPD), voted against it. This development illustrates the deep divisions within the German Government on what the best course of action should be in response to the rising geo-political tensions on the EU’s Eastern frontier.  Continue Reading